Chia Seeds: Know These Small Seeds With Immense Nutrition

Plant-Based Meal
Plant-Based Meal
Plant-Based Meal
Plant-Based Meal

You can see the term superfood everywhere, whether it is kombucha or kale. Yet this post is a shout-out to chia seeds for their nutritional profile and unique culinary properties. Belonging to the mint family of plants, Chia is a flowering plant and its seeds come in black as well as white color. Although, in terms of their nutritional profile there is no difference between white and black seeds; it is the black ones that are more commonly used.

Chia seeds have become popular in the past decade or so and are popular among plant-based consumer goods. These seeds are a good source of protein and an ounce of chia seeds can provide about 4 grams of protein. Besides, an ounce of chia seeds provides about 20% of the recommended daily allowance of calcium, together with 30% of the recommended daily allowance of manganese, phosphorus, and magnesium, and small amounts of zinc, potassium, and copper.

Chia seeds contain more calcium than a coequal quantum of dairy products. Furthermore, these seeds are a complete protein source, as they contain all of the necessitous amino acids – all nine of them. For all these reasons, chia seeds can be rightly called a superfood. Let us see the other things that make chia seeds a superfood.

High Fiber Content And Low Carbohydrates 

You will be able to find many chia seeds pudding recipes online and there is a reason for that. Chia seeds are very much suitable to make plant-based puddings and so, they are liked by many people following a plant-based meal plan. When soaked in water for about two hours, these small seeds plump up to form a viscous gel. This gel can be substituted as a thickener for smoothies, sauces, stews, and soups.

Chia seeds are an appreciable source of fiber. If you wish to increase your fiber intake, you can include these tiny seeds in your plant-based meal plan. The soluble fiber in chia seeds gel can help lower bad cholesterol that can build up in your arteries and can slow down digestion, to offer you a sense of fullness. The gelled chia seeds can be stored for nearly a week in the refrigerator.

If you like crunchy fiber, you can have whole chia seeds or grind them to add to smoothies, as toppings for cooked veggies or salads, stirred into oatmeal, and yogurt, etc. With its tender and scarcely noticeable savor, chia seeds can go well with all kinds of cuisines.